Articles Posted in Automobile Accidents

Following an unexpected accident, you may feel at a loss for what to do next. In the event that you decide to file a personal injury claim on behalf of yourself or a loved one to recover compensation, it is crucial that you do your research and speak with an experienced attorney. In Virginia, like other states, personal injury laws can vary and, depending on the circumstances of your claim, may impact the success of your claim in different ways.

According to a recent news report, a 13-year-old boy died following a two-car collision. Local authorities noted that the boy was a passenger in a car traveling north when the car attempted to make a left turn to enter a shopping center. The car then collided with another vehicle that was traveling south. Based on a preliminary investigation, the boy was taken to the hospital, where he was pronounced dead. Both drivers suffered injuries also, but they did not appear to be life-threatening. Local authorities are still investigating the details of the accident.

If you or someone you love was recently involved in a similar accident and you are considering filing a lawsuit, you may be wondering what Virginia laws may impact your case.

While death is an inevitable part of life, the unexpected death of a loved one because of another’s negligence often exacerbates the trauma one experiences. Those who have experienced the loss of a loved one under these circumstances should consult with a Virginia wrongful death attorney.

Wrongful death claims refer to lawsuits filed by the family members of someone who suffered fatal injuries because of another’s negligence or reckless conduct. These claims are similar to other personal injury lawsuits, except for the parties and damage calculations. Under the state’s Wrongful Death Statute, a personal representative of the deceased’s estate or the party appointed by will or the state may bring a lawsuit. The law entitled the spouse or children of the victim to collect damages. However, certain other dependent family members may be permitted to collect damages. Generally, these parties include parents, siblings, and other close family members.

Wrongful death cases typically stem from motor vehicle accidents, medical malpractice, and products liability cases. For instance, news sources recently reported that a 20-year-old man suffered fatal injuries in a Virginia accident. A pickup truck driver veered into the centerline of a bridge and slammed into the man. The man’s vehicle flipped over before finally coming to a rest on its wheel. Tragically, the 20-year-old died, and his passenger and the pickup truck driver suffered severe injuries.

Determining liability after a car crash—meaning who is responsible for the injuries that occurred—is essential to effectively bring a Virginia personal injury lawsuit. While some cases are clear-cut, there are instances where the injured person—the plaintiff—may share some blame for the accident as well. If the plaintiff is found even partially at fault for the accident, this impacts the potential damages award they may receive. Because of this, it is critical to know how Virginia treats plaintiffs who are found partially at fault for the accident.

Recently in Suffolk, a ten-vehicle crash caused all southbound lanes to be closed for an afternoon. According to police, the incident occurred around 2:00pm, and it took over two hours to clear the roads. While there still is no information about potential injuries of people involved in the crash, the accident caused major delays and the backup was at least two miles long.

States differ in how they assess liability depending on the plaintiff’s potential fault in the accident. The question of how much—if any—the plaintiff is responsible for their own injuries is decided by the jury. After hearing all of the evidence at trial, the jury will determine how much they believe the plaintiff is at fault. The percentage the jury decides upon—along with the state the case is being brought in—impacts how much the plaintiff can financially recover from the lawsuit.

Driving late at night can often mean additional risks. Sometimes, however, driving later in the day is simply unavoidable because of things beyond our control. Because of the inherent additional risks of driving in the evenings, however, car accidents that take place later in the day can often be more devastating than usual. Thus, when these incidents happen because of the recklessness or negligence of another driver, it is crucial that those who are responsible are held accountable for their actions.

According to a recent local news report, a two-vehicle car accident sent five people to the hospital. Police reported that the car accident took place around 2:00 AM when a Dodge Challenger was traveling at a “high rate of speed” and rear-ended a Ford Escape. The impact of this initial crash caused the Dodge Challenger to veer off the roadway, flip over, and crash into the jersey wall. The Challenger then went over the guardrail and into the vegetation on the side of the road, which caused all three passengers to suffer life-threatening injuries. The two passengers in the Ford Escape also suffered life-threatening injuries. All five individuals were transported to a local hospital for treatment. The crash remains under investigation by local authorities.

Following a major car accident involving significant physical injury and property damage, you may feel overwhelmed about what to do next. Potential plaintiffs of major accidents are often advised to consider filing a personal injury lawsuit to recover monetary damages after such accidents. Before doing so, however, it is crucial to understand the basics of laws that govern Virginia personal injury lawsuits and may have an impact on the success of your claim.

When loved ones have been tragically killed in a fatal Virginia car crash, the family will often want to hold the responsible party accountable. Their best option is to bring a wrongful death lawsuit and seek monetary damages. In Virginia, there are strict requirements the family must meet in order to be awarded damages by a jury. While damages can never bring a deceased family member back, they can help the family to financially recuperate from their loss while they emotionally grieve.

Recently, in an accident in Virginia Beach, a pedestrian was struck on Northampton Boulevard by a car. According to a local news report, the pedestrian was walking across the road when the driver hit him. He died at the scene, and the driver of the vehicle was charged with possession of narcotics and various traffic offenses.

In accidents similar to the one above, the family of the deceased can bring a wrongful death lawsuit against the responsible party. In doing so, they seek damages for the death of their loved one. Damages widely vary depending on the facts of the case. In Virginia, there is no cap on damages—meaning, a jury can award any amount of money to the plaintiff it sees fit. Their only guideline is to agree upon an amount they deem “fair and just.” The damages amount can include, but are not limited to, some of the following: sorrow and mental anguish, loss of income of the deceased, hospital expenses, and funeral expenses.

After suffering injuries in a Virginia car accident, victims and their loved ones might be able to recover compensation for their damages. However, these lawsuits, especially when they involve multiple vehicles, require a thorough understanding of complex procedural, evidentiary, and substantive laws. The primary challenges in these cases revolve around the state’s statute of limitations and contributory negligence laws.

Virginia’s statute of limitations sets the time limit a victim or family has to commence a lawsuit. It is important to note that this statute of limitations does not apply to car insurance claims. The time limits for filing a claim with an insurance company depend mainly on the policy terms. Insurance provisions tend to limit the amount of time to a few days or weeks.

After a Virginia car accident, there are generally three statutes that come into play. The relevant statute of limitations applies to car accident lawsuits, property damage claims, and wrongful death lawsuits. Virginia motor vehicle lawsuits must be filed within two years of the incident. Property damage claims must be filed within five years of the accident. Finally, the statute of limitations for wrongful death lawsuits starts running on the day of the victim’s death.

Maryland falls in line with other states and requires motorists to carry minimum car insurance coverage. Driving without car insurance in Maryland can result in various consequences to the at-fault driver and any accident victims. While the law prohibits motorists from driving without insurance, that does not deter many people from engaging in this illegal conduct. Getting into an accident with an uninsured or underinsured motorist can create long-term medical and financial consequences for an accident victim.

The most recent accident data from Maryland shows that there were nearly 116,000 total car crashes in 2019. Approximately 33,000 of those accidents resulted in bodily injury, and over 82,000 accidents caused property damage. Maryland is an at-fault state, which means that drivers are liable for the damages they cause in an accident. However, while the state requires motorists to carry appropriate coverage, about 14% of the drivers in the accidents mentioned above were uninsured. These startling facts reveal that a significant number of accident victims likely did not recover adequate damages through an insurance claim.

While Maryland insurance laws require drivers to carry liability insurance, it is essential to note that this coverage only applies to at-fault drivers who cause injuries to others in an accident. The coverage does not protect a driver for the injuries or damages they suffered in an accident. Some motorists opt to add on additional coverage, such as collision, comprehensive, or medical coverage. However, these are optional and do not apply in every accident case and are not always beneficial to the party who needs coverage. For example, medical payments coverage covers the insured motorist and their passengers, regardless of fault, but does not apply to the other driver or their passengers.

Car accidents in Virginia are dangerous, and unfortunately, sometimes lead to death. In cases like this, the last thing on the family’s mind is to bring a lawsuit. However, in cases where there is a party responsible for the incident and it could have been prevented, their loved ones should pursue a wrongful death lawsuit. This can assist in their financial recovery—especially if the deceased provided the primary earnings for the family—as they are also emotionally grieving. Below is more information about wrongful death lawsuits and the necessary elements a plaintiff would need to prove to be successful in the case.

Recently, a man was killed in Powhatan County after a three-vehicle crash. According to a news report, a car was heading west when it slowed down to make a left turn and was struck from behind. This vehicle was then hit by another car, which ran off the road, spun and struck some trees. The man whose vehicle was struck from behind unfortunately passed away after the incident. Besides the man’s death, his son remains in the hospital and individuals in the third vehicle were also airlifted to the hospital. The driver who caused the accident, a teenager, has been charged with reckless driving.

In situations where a family member is killed, it is likely that criminal charges will be pursued—like in this case. However, the family of the deceased loved one should still bring charges to hold the responsible party financially liable for the incident. In Virginia, a wrongful death is one caused by the wrongful act, neglect, or default of another party. This means that the plaintiff in the case—the spouse, child, parent, or any other relative of the deceased—must show that if it were not for the responsible party’s action, their loved one would not have died.

As the world begins to reopen, more people have been out and about on the streets. With more vehicles on the road, however, it also means there are more pedestrians. Because there is more traffic on our roads and crosswalks, the risk of a potential Virginia pedestrian accident is higher than it has been in recent months—and drivers and pedestrians must both exercise the necessary precautions to remain safe.

In a recent news article, a vehicle hit a pedestrian at a Virginia intersection. According to authorities, the pedestrian was transported to a local hospital with moderate injuries. The accident remains under investigation, and law enforcement is still examining who is at fault since it was not immediately clear following the collision.

Virginia, similar to other states, has specific laws pertaining to pedestrian safety. In Virginia, pedestrians are expected to always use crosswalks and adhere to proper safety procedures when crossing, if available. Motorists in Virginia are further expected to ensure the safety of pedestrians by yielding to them on marked and unmarked crosswalks.

When it comes to determining whether an injured person can pursue a Virginia personal injury claim after an accident, Virginia relies on the doctrine of contributory negligence. Contributory negligence is a harsh rule, that prohibits any injured person from bringing a claim against any other at-fault party, if the accident victim shares any blame for causing the accident. Thus, if a motorist is found to be only five percent at fault for a car accident, they could not file a Virginia car accident lawsuit against the other driver who was 95 percent responsible.

Clearly, the contributory negligence rule can lead to some very unfair results. And despite years of efforts from personal injury attorneys and some politicians, state lawmakers refuse to adjust the doctrine. Notably, Virginia is one of only a few states that still use contributory negligence. Most other states rely on a doctrine called comparative fault, in which an at-fault accident victim can still recover for their injuries, but will only recover a reduced amount. Specifically, the accident victim’s damages award is reduced by their own percentage of fault.

However, there is a very important exception to Virginia’s contributory negligence rule in accidents involving common carriers. A common carrier is an individual or business that transports people for a fee. For example, buses, taxis, and Uber and Lyft drivers are all common carriers.

Contact Information